Behind the scenes of Jurassic III (2001)

Behind the scenes of Jurassic III (2001)

(Source: cinecat)

Reblogged from thethreehares
24
Mar

smithsonianlibraries:

Our good friends at the Biodiversity Heritage Library have assembled a great collection of works published, written, illustrated, or including the research of women, just for Women’s History Month.

[image from Maria Sybilla Merian’s European Insects 1730]

Reblogged from smithsonianlibraries
18
Mar
brandx:

mothernaturenetwork:

12-year-old invents Braille printer using Lego setThe Braigo printer cost its inventor about $350, making it more affordable than other Braille printers that can retail for more than $2,000.

And because I seriously side-eye this Western journalism trend of never crediting and NAMING the actual inventors in the headlines (especially when they’re young POC)
this inventor’s name is Shubham Banerjee, and he is making his glorious design completely open source, publishing it online FREE of charge! Just remember this kid’s name before some crusty old white dude “innovates” his design and takes all the credit.

brandx:

mothernaturenetwork:

12-year-old invents Braille printer using Lego set
The Braigo printer cost its inventor about $350, making it more affordable than other Braille printers that can retail for more than $2,000.

And because I seriously side-eye this Western journalism trend of never crediting and NAMING the actual inventors in the headlines (especially when they’re young POC)

this inventor’s name is Shubham Banerjee, and he is making his glorious design completely open source, publishing it online FREE of charge! Just remember this kid’s name before some crusty old white dude “innovates” his design and takes all the credit.

(Source: mothernaturenetwork)

Reblogged from rynia
23
Feb

passivemanipulations:

Project for my Social Psych class last semester. This poster series was created to 1) challenge these internalized stereotypes by bringing them to the viewer’s attention and 2) expand the range of role models by including a diverse group of women. Each poster follows the same basic pattern: a woman who has demonstrated her competency in a particular area refutes the stereotype that appears above her in the form of “Girls can’t …”. While the posters target girls ranging from children to young adults, I expect the message would also cause people outside that demographic to question their own beliefs about women and power.  I designed each aspect of the posters with several principles of social psychology in mind:

Peripheral route: When operating under the peripheral route, we judge persuasive appeal based on superficial characteristics such as attractiveness and credibility. I placed an attractive image of each woman over a black background, and the colors I chose complement each other well.  I hand-lettered the main text to give each poster a sense of artistry, using an easy-to-read, official looking font as the basis for my work.  Additionally, the women themselves are relatively well known.  Their accomplishments, listed in the short blurb at the bottom of each poster, are impressive as well as irrefutable.

Relevance: We are more likely to be persuaded when we can relate the argument back to ourselves.  These posters rely on the availability heuristic (since these stereotypes are readily available and common in society, media, and our own experiences) to establish an immediate relevancy.  The statement at the top is attention grabbing by its controversial nature alone.  However, it is also relevant to multiple groups, including but not limited to: 1) people who identify as girls, 2) people who have an opinion about girls, and 3) people who participate in the activity listed. I tried to include a wide range of activities (e.g., science, math, business, leadership, politics, athletics) and a diverse group of women (e.g., time period, nationality, ethnic background, age, area of expertise) to widen the range and appeal of the posters.  The use of the term “we” also serves to compound the relevancy effect towards the main target audience by establishing in-group membership.

Central route: Because of the blatant use of stereotypes and the establishment of relevancy, the viewer now has a motivation to pay attention.   Keeping the poster visually simple and limiting the biographical information helps by minimizing distractions.  The QR code in the corner gives the viewer the means to access more information, if desired.  Ideally, each QR code would link to the affiliated website (the URL would also be listed), but for now they link to relevant Wikipedia page.           

Reactance and negative potency: Because we are less likely to change our minds when we feel like someone is trying to persuade us, I avoided mentioning the groups who held these stereotypes, so as not to alienate them, and did not use American political figures.  I also did not attempt to convince girls to be more like the women portrayed. Additionally, because negative things are more potent than their positive counterparts, these posters run the risk of reinforcing the stereotype (“Girl’s can’t X”) rather than the counterargument (“Except we can”) or counterexample (the woman and her accomplishments).  To minimize this, I placed the counterargument phrase in a speech bubble, portraying the woman as having a voice and worthy of our attention.  I made the counterargument larger than any of the other text and placed it near the negative statement to provide an obvious, strong response.  In some posters, the woman’s statement even breaks up the stereotype.  I also colored the speech bubble and counterargument phrase, highlighting its difference from the preceding text as well as subtly raising its credibility through the color gold.

Attitude Inoculation: By exposing people to these stereotypes and providing notable counterexamples, these posters can potentially ‘vaccinate’ against the ubiquitous and persuasive sexism in our society.  Viewers could then use the provided information to make their own credible and persuasive appeals against the stereotypes.

Reblogged from jojoseames
21
Feb

hsprops:

Commission for Kirk.

He wanted a robot arm that glowed due to radiation. The design was mostly left to me and this is what I came up with.

Media involved: EVA foam, hotglue, and Folkart acrylics.


Thanks,

HSProps

Reblogged from burgerthief
20
Jan

sweetnhard:

westafricanwomen:

sancophaleague:

"Ola Orekunrin was studying to become a doctor in the UK a few years ago when her younger sister fell seriously ill while traveling in Nigeria. The 12-year-old girl, who’d gone to the West African country on holiday with relatives, needed urgent care but the nearest hospital couldn’t deal with her condition.

Orekunrin and her family immediately began looking for an air ambulance service to rapidly transport the girl, a sickle cell anemia sufferer, to a more suitable healthcare facility. They searched all across West Africa but were stunned to find out there was none in the whole region.

"The nearest one at the time was in South Africa," remembers Orekunrin. "They had a 12-hour activation time so by the time they were ready to activate, my sister was dead." (Cnn.com)

Orekunrin did the latter. Motivated by the tragic death of her sister, the young doctor decided to leave behind a high-flying job in the UK to take to the Nigerian skies and address the vital issue of urgent healthcare in Africa’s most populous country.

Flying helicopters, speaking Japanese

At 27, there isn’t much Orekunrin hasn’t achieved.

She is England’s Youngest Doctor.

Born in London, she grew up in a foster home in the charming seaside town of Lowestoft in the south-east of England.

Aged 21, Orekunrin had already graduated from the University of York as a qualified doctor. She was then awarded the MEXT Japanese Government Scholarship and moved to Japan to conduct research in the field of regenerative medicine.

After moving back to Europe the young doctor looked set for a promising career in medicine in the UK. But her desire to improve healthcare services in West Africa brought her back to her roots.

Orekunrin quit her job, sold her assets and went on to study evacuation models and air ambulance services in other developing countries before launching her ambitious venture, which enables her to combine her “deep love for medicine and Africa” with her growing passion for flying — Orekunrin is also a also a trainee helicopter pilot.” (CNN.COM)

Stand FOR SOMETHING!!!

Post Put together by @solar_innerg

#sancophaleague #BlackWomen #Nigeria #Orekunrin #Doctor #Success #blackexcellence

More West African women here

The things I want on my dash.

Reblogged from diasporicroots
12
Jan

theblondebitch:

London Comic Con October 2013

Hot fucking DAMN Assassins from all over the world and a shitton of different time periods?!

Rifle Assassin in the third gif could get it so hard.

(Source: ssophoo)

Reblogged from cyclopette
27
Nov
dduane:

circusmaster:

khito:

pyrrhiccomedy:


Astronomers have discovered the largest known structure in the universe, a clump of active galactic cores that stretch 4 billion light-years from end to end. The structure is a light quasar group (LQG), a collection of extremely luminous Galactic Nulcei powered by supermassive central black holes.

So that’s cool and everything, but maybe some of you would be interested to know why this is a significant find? Beyond just its record-setting bigness.
Since Einstein, physicists have accepted something called the Cosmological Principle, which states that the universe looks the same everywhere if you view it on a large enough scale. You might find some weird shit over here, and some other freaky shit over there, but if you pull back the camera far enough, you’ll find that same weird and/or freaky shit cropping up over and over again in a fairly regular distribution. This is because the universe is (probably) infinite in size and (we are pretty darn sure) has, and has always had, the same forces acting on it everywhere.
So why is this new LQG so radical? (It stands for ‘Large Quasar Group,’ btw, not ‘Light Quasar Group.’)
Well, let’s try to comprehend the scale we’re dealing with. A ‘megaparsec,’ written Mpc, is about 3.2 million light years long. The Milky Way is about 0.03 Mpc across (or 100,000 light years). The distance between our galaxy and Andromeda, our closest galactic neighbor, is 0.75 Mpc, or 2.5 million light years. LQGs are usually about 200 Mpc across. Assuming a logarithmic distribution of weird shit outliers (if you don’t know how logarithmic distribution curves work, don’t worry about it), cosmologists predicted that nothing in the universe should be more than 370 Mpc across.
This new LQG is 1200 Mpc long. That’s four billion light years. Four BILLION LIGHT YEARS. Just to travel from one side to the other of this one thing. I mean for fuck’s sake, the universe is only about 14 billion years old! How many of these things could there be? 
Right now it looks like the Cosmological Principle might be out the window, unless physicists can find some way to make the existence of this new LQG work with the math (and boy, are they trying). And that’s totally baffling. It would mean—well, we don’t have any idea what it would mean. That the universe isn’t essentially uniform? That some ‘special’ physics apply/applied in some places but not in others? That Something Happened that is totally outside our current ability to understand or quantify stuff happening?
By the way, no one lives there. The radiation from so many quasars would sterilize rock.
Sources: 1 2 3

are you telling us astronomers have discovered something which is literally fucktuple the size of anything else previously estimated to exist

Anything that fucking rewrites all of what we know about the universe needs to get its ass on my blog. It’s giant, glowy, black hole filled ass. 

Wondering how many times I can use the word “fucktuple” today without arousing suspicion. :)

dduane:

circusmaster:

khito:

pyrrhiccomedy:

Astronomers have discovered the largest known structure in the universe, a clump of active galactic cores that stretch 4 billion light-years from end to end. The structure is a light quasar group (LQG), a collection of extremely luminous Galactic Nulcei powered by supermassive central black holes.

So that’s cool and everything, but maybe some of you would be interested to know why this is a significant find? Beyond just its record-setting bigness.

Since Einstein, physicists have accepted something called the Cosmological Principle, which states that the universe looks the same everywhere if you view it on a large enough scale. You might find some weird shit over here, and some other freaky shit over there, but if you pull back the camera far enough, you’ll find that same weird and/or freaky shit cropping up over and over again in a fairly regular distribution. This is because the universe is (probably) infinite in size and (we are pretty darn sure) has, and has always had, the same forces acting on it everywhere.

So why is this new LQG so radical? (It stands for ‘Large Quasar Group,’ btw, not ‘Light Quasar Group.’)

Well, let’s try to comprehend the scale we’re dealing with. A ‘megaparsec,’ written Mpc, is about 3.2 million light years long. The Milky Way is about 0.03 Mpc across (or 100,000 light years). The distance between our galaxy and Andromeda, our closest galactic neighbor, is 0.75 Mpc, or 2.5 million light years. LQGs are usually about 200 Mpc across. Assuming a logarithmic distribution of weird shit outliers (if you don’t know how logarithmic distribution curves work, don’t worry about it), cosmologists predicted that nothing in the universe should be more than 370 Mpc across.

This new LQG is 1200 Mpc long. That’s four billion light years. Four BILLION LIGHT YEARS. Just to travel from one side to the other of this one thing. I mean for fuck’s sake, the universe is only about 14 billion years old! How many of these things could there be? 

Right now it looks like the Cosmological Principle might be out the window, unless physicists can find some way to make the existence of this new LQG work with the math (and boy, are they trying). And that’s totally baffling. It would mean—well, we don’t have any idea what it would mean. That the universe isn’t essentially uniform? That some ‘special’ physics apply/applied in some places but not in others? That Something Happened that is totally outside our current ability to understand or quantify stuff happening?

By the way, no one lives there. The radiation from so many quasars would sterilize rock.

Sources: 1 2 3

are you telling us astronomers have discovered something which is literally fucktuple the size of anything else previously estimated to exist

Anything that fucking rewrites all of what we know about the universe needs to get its ass on my blog. It’s giant, glowy, black hole filled ass. 

Wondering how many times I can use the word “fucktuple” today without arousing suspicion. :)

(Source: wasbella102)

Reblogged from rynia
9
Nov

afghanistaninphotos:

Girls skating - Afghanistan (x)

Reblogged from cyclopette
27
Oct

aspookygrim:

youareallbasicbitches:

wagwias:

vipvictor:

ceruleancynic:

mechanicaljewel:

A lobster is smarter than me.

that’s a mantis shrimp

and it is definitely smarter than me

whattt??!!!

can you imagine it being just like FUCK ALL THESE MIXED UP COLORS.

i love how to tosses it out the reef after it accomplished it

the true story behind this is actually pretty hilarious!

The clip was used as promotional teaser for a BBC series called “Wildlife on 1” hosted by David Attenborough. We filmed a half hour program on my research on stomatopods called “Fastest Claw in the West”. One sequence looked at the ability of stomatopods to learn to open plastic cubes to obtain shrimp. The cubes were hollow and a glass plate covered the hole. To get the shrimp, the animal had to break the glass - much the same behavior needed to open a snail. The stomatopods were presented two cubes of different colors or with different patterns. Only one cube contained food and they had to learn which one. They learn this fairly quickly.

One day while shooting, we went to lunch and walked past a shop that had a Rubik’s cube keychain in the window. It was the same size as the cubes we were using with the stomatopods. I bought it and in between filming, we gave it to one of the O. scyllarus. It would retrieve it like it would a feeding cube, turn it around and strike. We got the idea of shooting a sequence with the animal “solving” the cube. We kept presenting the cube in various states of solution to the animal and eventually a solved cube. Just as they would a snail shell, when the animal determines that there is no more food to be had, they through out the remains. It was then easy to cut together a sequence of the cube being “solved” along with some head scratching (eye cleansing), etc. When Attenborough saw it, he decided to use it as a promo piece.

… this according to a 2006 post by a dude named Roy on the Reef Central forums, anyway. Prettttty great.

to make it even better, dudebro also says this of the clip:

I couldn’t even do it. I had to physically take it apart and and change it between takes.

which is just v v important imo. :’) LIKE. lordy.

(Source: iraffiruse)

Reblogged from aflightygrim
18
Oct

vimeo:

Etereas / Animation Shortfilm by Flaminguettes

The Mexico City-based motion graphics duo Flaminguettes give hula-hooping an animated twist.

Reblogged from cyclopette
16
Oct

youngblackandvegan:

mirnah:

Rick Owens Spring 2014

Rick Owens, the king of the luxury gothic look, decided to forget the  models that usually walk the runway and opted for an exclusive cast of steppers to perform a full routine on the catwalk. It was probably the biggest celebration of racial and body diversity in any of the Fashion Week show this season. They definitely made fashion history by adding something special to Owens sporty, leather, black, white, and cream collection.

You can take a look at the short video here.

via

here for all of this!!!!!

Reblogged from aflightygrim
12
Oct

reprobaverum:

RGB almost finished commissioned wall painting, HELL’S AQUARIUM.
Photo’s displaying all three colour layers in white light, soon to upload RGB lighting filter photo’s.

Reblogged from scientificillustration
29
Sep

the-absolute-best-posts:

mydollyaviana:

Disney villains & their voice actors/actresses (Pixar not included)

Reblogged from thethreehares
28
Sep
cellarspider:

camperjon:

peashooter85:

What fighting like a girl was all about in Georgian Era Britain —- Elizabeth “Lady Bare Knuckles” Stokes
Think that women’s boxing or MMA fighting is a recent development in fighting sports?  Think again.  From the 18th to early 19th century it was not uncommon for women to fight in the ring as well as men.  Back then boxing was not the boxing of today, not by a long shot.  Venues tended to be saloons, pubs, small arenas, or even open streets and back-alleys.  Rules differed from venue to venue, but for the most part fights were done bare knuckled, and many fights were a no holds barred type setup.  Some fights even included deadly weapons such as clubs, swords, and staves.  Needless to say, injury and death was common.
One of the most famous female fighters in early 18th century Britain was Elizabeth Stokes (born Elizabeth Wilkinson), a mother and fighter whose career lasted mostly throughout the 1720’s.  In 1722 she was challenged by Hannah Highfield for a prize of three guineas.  Stokes accepted the challenge by offered a counter challenge,
 “I, Elizabeth Wilkinson of Clerkenwell, who had earlier had some words with Hannah Hyfield, ‘challenged and invited’ her adversary to meet her on the stage for three guineas. Each fighter would hold half-a-crown in each hand and the first to drop the money would lose the battle”
Elizabeth won after a 22 minute fight, giving Hannah Hyfield a savage thumping that caused her to drop her coin.  Later in the evening she won another fight against a woman named Martha Jones.
After the fight with Hannah Hyfield Stoke’s career took off, making her the most popular female fighter in Britain and earning her the name “Lady Bareknuckles”.  After marrying her husand James Stokes, the couple often fought in paired and tag-team matches.  Incredibly Stoke’s even fought men on a number of occasions, something that was rare in bareknuckle boxing.  Even more incredibly, she trounced them every time, beating the crap out of them with her swift and powerful fists.  Not only was she a master pugilist, Stokes was also skilled with weapons as well.  She was known to be particularly skilled with the cudgel and short sword.
By the mid 19th century women’s fighting had come to a close as professional organizations, rules, and Victorian Era prejudices against women drove the sport underground and turned fighting into a gentlemen’s sport.

I don’t know why bare-knuckle Pugilism is so interesting to me
Maybe I just like people punching things with their bare fists
But dammit if the sport it isn’t going to be a big part of Ranger Pugsly’s camp

Fun fact: Although the weapons fighting is obviously horribly dangerous, bareknuckle fighting can be less dangerous than fighting with gloves. You wouldn’t so often be punching for the head like in the picture above, you’d be going for body blows. Misjudge a punch to the head and you can break your hand. Gloves make it possible to punch to the head consistently and add more weight, meaning the padding of the gloves doesn’t do a damn thing to lessen the brain damage you’re accumulating. In fact, they were introduced to make fights shorter, because rather than a brawl that could literally go on for 75 rounds or more, gloves mean quicker knock-outs from repeated blows to the head.
The one thing bareknuckle fights definitely are is bloodier, but they’re far less likely to be fatal or result in brain damage. 
Also, I’ve just found out that the two most famous male fighters of the period once acted as seconds to a Mrs. Mary Ann Fielding and “a Jewess of Wentworth Street”, for an 80 minute match. 70 knockdowns between the two women, with Mrs. Fielding eventually claiming the prize of 11 guineas. I’m also finding names such as Bruising Peg, The Boxing Baroness, The Hibernian Heroine. It’s oddly glorious. Definitely worth checking out more on.

cellarspider:

camperjon:

peashooter85:

What fighting like a girl was all about in Georgian Era Britain —- Elizabeth “Lady Bare Knuckles” Stokes

Think that women’s boxing or MMA fighting is a recent development in fighting sports?  Think again.  From the 18th to early 19th century it was not uncommon for women to fight in the ring as well as men.  Back then boxing was not the boxing of today, not by a long shot.  Venues tended to be saloons, pubs, small arenas, or even open streets and back-alleys.  Rules differed from venue to venue, but for the most part fights were done bare knuckled, and many fights were a no holds barred type setup.  Some fights even included deadly weapons such as clubs, swords, and staves.  Needless to say, injury and death was common.

One of the most famous female fighters in early 18th century Britain was Elizabeth Stokes (born Elizabeth Wilkinson), a mother and fighter whose career lasted mostly throughout the 1720’s.  In 1722 she was challenged by Hannah Highfield for a prize of three guineas.  Stokes accepted the challenge by offered a counter challenge,

 “I, Elizabeth Wilkinson of Clerkenwell, who had earlier had some words with Hannah Hyfield, ‘challenged and invited’ her adversary to meet her on the stage for three guineas. Each fighter would hold half-a-crown in each hand and the first to drop the money would lose the battle”


Elizabeth won after a 22 minute fight, giving Hannah Hyfield a savage thumping that caused her to drop her coin.  Later in the evening she won another fight against a woman named Martha Jones.

After the fight with Hannah Hyfield Stoke’s career took off, making her the most popular female fighter in Britain and earning her the name “Lady Bareknuckles”.  After marrying her husand James Stokes, the couple often fought in paired and tag-team matches.  Incredibly Stoke’s even fought men on a number of occasions, something that was rare in bareknuckle boxing.  Even more incredibly, she trounced them every time, beating the crap out of them with her swift and powerful fists.  Not only was she a master pugilist, Stokes was also skilled with weapons as well.  She was known to be particularly skilled with the cudgel and short sword.

By the mid 19th century women’s fighting had come to a close as professional organizations, rules, and Victorian Era prejudices against women drove the sport underground and turned fighting into a gentlemen’s sport.

I don’t know why bare-knuckle Pugilism is so interesting to me

Maybe I just like people punching things with their bare fists

But dammit if the sport it isn’t going to be a big part of Ranger Pugsly’s camp

Fun fact: Although the weapons fighting is obviously horribly dangerous, bareknuckle fighting can be less dangerous than fighting with gloves. You wouldn’t so often be punching for the head like in the picture above, you’d be going for body blows. Misjudge a punch to the head and you can break your hand. Gloves make it possible to punch to the head consistently and add more weight, meaning the padding of the gloves doesn’t do a damn thing to lessen the brain damage you’re accumulating. In fact, they were introduced to make fights shorter, because rather than a brawl that could literally go on for 75 rounds or more, gloves mean quicker knock-outs from repeated blows to the head.

The one thing bareknuckle fights definitely are is bloodier, but they’re far less likely to be fatal or result in brain damage. 

Also, I’ve just found out that the two most famous male fighters of the period once acted as seconds to a Mrs. Mary Ann Fielding and “a Jewess of Wentworth Street”, for an 80 minute match. 70 knockdowns between the two women, with Mrs. Fielding eventually claiming the prize of 11 guineas. I’m also finding names such as Bruising Peg, The Boxing Baroness, The Hibernian Heroine. It’s oddly glorious. Definitely worth checking out more on.

(Source: peashooter85)

Reblogged from aflightygrim
21
Sep