artoftrungles:

Can’t get enough merpeople

artoftrungles:

Can’t get enough merpeople

Reblogged from artoftrungles
12
Jan
Reblogged from theartofanimation
11
Sep

aquaticarbiter:

These are a long time coming. Finally getting around to posting my underwater Feferi shoot. I’d like to do another one now that the costume has been improved some but I thought these came out rather well.

Ah, these are excellent! Great job :D

Reblogged from aquaticarbiter
10
Sep

archiemcphee:

Kawaii!! All hail the awesome Bobtail Squid! 

 Pictured above are Berry’s Bobtail Squid (Euprymna berryi), photo by Rokus Groeneveld, and a Striped Pyjama Squid (Sepioloidea lineolata), photo by Tony Brown.

ferrebeekeeper assembled a fascinating post all about Bobtail squid, who are closely related to another awesome creature, the cuttlefish:

With huge expressive eyes, tiny little tentacles, and opalescent skin, bobtail squids look like they were designed by a Sanrio artist having a strange day. Sepiolida cephalopods appear to be all head (they are also known as dumpling squid or stubby squid because of this shape)–and their large rounded navigation fins, which stick out like Dumbo’s ears only add to the impression.”

“There are approximately 70 known species of bobtail squid living in the shallow coastal waters from the Mediterranean, to the Indian Ocean, to the Pacific.  To quote the Tree of Life Website, “Members of the Sepiolida are short (mostly 2-8 cm), broad cephalopods with a rounded posterior mantle.” The animals are gifted hunters which eat shrimp, arthropods, and other small animals which they chomp apart with a horny beak at the center of their arms. During the day, bobtail squid bury themselves in the sand with only their eyes protruding and then they hunt at night.”

Visit ferrebeekeeper to learn more about and view more photos of the awesome bobtail squid!

So cute

Reblogged from archiemcphee
19
Feb

archiemcphee:

Russian biologist Alexander Semenov graduated in 2007 from Moscow State University’s zoology department where he studied invertebrate animals. Specifically: squid brains. [For which he wins extra awesomeness points!] Now he works as the chief of his diving team at the White Sea Biological Station, camera always in-hand, where he’s captured some of these extraordinary photographs of jellyfish and other wildlife. You can see more images in his photo galleries or you can follow him on Flickr.

[via Colossal]

Oh so lovely and delicate…

Reblogged from archiemcphee
22
Jan