smithsonianmag:

Macro Photos of Bees’ Heads

From the USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab’s Flickr page come these amazing photos of bees’ heads. Photographed by Sam Droege, these photos offer a glimpse into the micro world of bees that most never see.

Ed note: This new sperm bank for honey bees could help fight colony collapse disorder.

h/t BoingBoing

Reblogged from smithsonianmag
10
Sep
archiemcphee:

Oh hai! French macro photographer Fabien Bravin captured this awesome image of a teeny-tiny praying mantis larva peering over the top of an American poppy flower. The photo was published by National Geographic.
[via Le Journal De La Photographie]

archiemcphee:

Oh hai! French macro photographer Fabien Bravin captured this awesome image of a teeny-tiny praying mantis larva peering over the top of an American poppy flower. The photo was published by National Geographic.

[via Le Journal De La Photographie]

Reblogged from archiemcphee
25
Nov
Reblogged from smithsonianmag
20
Aug

guardian:

The life and times of Lonesome George

Lonesome George, the last of the Pinta island giant tortoises and a conservation icon, has died of unknown causes. He was believed to be about 100 years old. He was found in 1972 and become a symbol of the Galápagos Islands. His species helped Charles Darwin formulate his theory of evolution in the 19th century

Photographs: Rodrigo Buendia/AFP/Getty Images & Reuters

(Source: )

Reblogged from smithsonianmag
25
Jun

smithsonianmag:

Macro Photos Reveal the Mystical World of Insects

Courtesy of Thomas Shahan’s Flickr page come these spectacular photos of insects. Curious how Shahan captures such amazing images? Check out this video for all the answers.

Photos: Thomas Shahan

Ed note: Have you heard of the assassin bug? It stacks dead ant bodies on its back to confuse predators.

h/t Twisted Sifter

These are lovely, but that link to the assassin bug has given me a great idea for a story…

Reblogged from smithsonianmag
11
Jun

archiemcphee:

Kawaii!! All hail the awesome Bobtail Squid! 

 Pictured above are Berry’s Bobtail Squid (Euprymna berryi), photo by Rokus Groeneveld, and a Striped Pyjama Squid (Sepioloidea lineolata), photo by Tony Brown.

ferrebeekeeper assembled a fascinating post all about Bobtail squid, who are closely related to another awesome creature, the cuttlefish:

With huge expressive eyes, tiny little tentacles, and opalescent skin, bobtail squids look like they were designed by a Sanrio artist having a strange day. Sepiolida cephalopods appear to be all head (they are also known as dumpling squid or stubby squid because of this shape)–and their large rounded navigation fins, which stick out like Dumbo’s ears only add to the impression.”

“There are approximately 70 known species of bobtail squid living in the shallow coastal waters from the Mediterranean, to the Indian Ocean, to the Pacific.  To quote the Tree of Life Website, “Members of the Sepiolida are short (mostly 2-8 cm), broad cephalopods with a rounded posterior mantle.” The animals are gifted hunters which eat shrimp, arthropods, and other small animals which they chomp apart with a horny beak at the center of their arms. During the day, bobtail squid bury themselves in the sand with only their eyes protruding and then they hunt at night.”

Visit ferrebeekeeper to learn more about and view more photos of the awesome bobtail squid!

So cute

Reblogged from archiemcphee
19
Feb