Reblogged from theartofanimation
15
Aug
shellbow:

contemporaryelfinchild:

nowisthewinter:

peternyc:

Photo of a fight in the Ukranian Parliament or Renaissance painting? 

Slap them all in togas instead of suits and it would perfect

It also follows a pyramidal composition!

However, I would argue that this picture is more Baroque than Renaissance. Notable features of Baroque art are:
Images are direct, obvious, and dramatic.
Tries to draw the viewer in to participate in the scene.
Depictions feel physically and psychologically real. Emotionally intense.
Extravagant settings and ornamentation.
Dramatic use of color.
Dramatic contrasts between light and dark, light and shadow.
As opposed to Renaissance art with its clearly defined planes, with each figure placed in isolation from each other, Baroque art has continuous overlapping of figures and elements.
Common themes: grandiose visions, ecstasies and conversions, martyrdom and death, intense light, intense psychological moments.
In the baroque, artists strove to evoke aesthetic responses. Now I’m not talking about aesthetic as in “oh thats pretty” I’m talking about aesthetic like that punch in the gut reaction you get to something.
One of the ways this was done was through the depiction of intense emotion which we see in this photograph. compare to Bernini

The picture also displays a wonderful use of chiaroscuro (an effect of contrasted light and shadow created by light falling unevenly or from a particular direction on something) a style used extensively by Caravaggio and other Baroque artists.

 

shellbow:

contemporaryelfinchild:

nowisthewinter:

peternyc:

Photo of a fight in the Ukranian Parliament or Renaissance painting? 

Slap them all in togas instead of suits and it would perfect

It also follows a pyramidal composition!

However, I would argue that this picture is more Baroque than Renaissance. Notable features of Baroque art are:

  • Images are direct, obvious, and dramatic.
  • Tries to draw the viewer in to participate in the scene.
  • Depictions feel physically and psychologically real. Emotionally intense.
  • Extravagant settings and ornamentation.
  • Dramatic use of color.
  • Dramatic contrasts between light and dark, light and shadow.
  • As opposed to Renaissance art with its clearly defined planes, with each figure placed in isolation from each other, Baroque art has continuous overlapping of figures and elements.
  • Common themes: grandiose visions, ecstasies and conversions, martyrdom and death, intense light, intense psychological moments.

In the baroque, artists strove to evoke aesthetic responses. Now I’m not talking about aesthetic as in “oh thats pretty” I’m talking about aesthetic like that punch in the gut reaction you get to something.

One of the ways this was done was through the depiction of intense emotion which we see in this photograph. compare to Bernini

The picture also displays a wonderful use of chiaroscuro (an effect of contrasted light and shadow created by light falling unevenly or from a particular direction on something) a style used extensively by Caravaggio and other Baroque artists.

 

Reblogged from cyclopette
7
Aug

archiemcphee:

The work of Paris-based artist and E.N.S.A.D. researcher Lia Giraud is further proof that Science + Art = Awesome. These green photos weren’t taken, they were grown. Giraud cultures microscopic algae to form living landscapes and portraits. They aren’t photographs, they’re ‘algaegraphs.’

"The technique is similar to photography, but the photosensitivity of silver grains [in film] is replaced by photosensitive organisms: microalgae," says Giraud, 29.

To create each “algaegraph”, Giraud immerses the algae in a Petri dish filled with a mix of chemical nutrients, and exposes them to an image. “The cells react to the light and form solids of different densities,” she explains.

The outline of the image forms in just a few minutes, but it can take up to four days to achieve the final result. Click here to learn more.

[via designboom and Wired]

Reblogged from archiemcphee
4
Aug

archiemcphee:

Born in Hong Kong and now based in Pittsburgh, PA, artist Bovey Lee painstakingly hand cuts astonishingly intricate designs and scenes on large sheets of thin Chinese rice paper. These mesmerizing works are as awesomely detailed as they are delicate. Look closely and you’ll discover cityscapes hidden among leaves and grass or cars driving along what you first took to be blades of grass. Practically weightless all by them selves, Lee mounts her fragile cut paper pieces on silk before they’re hung on gallery walls.

Visit Bovey Lee’s cut paper gallery to check out more of her amazing cut paper creations.

[via Colossal]

Reblogged from archiemcphee
26
Jul

medievalpoc:

Fiction Week!

image

The Girl Who Spun Gold by Virginia Hamilton, Illustrated by Leo and Diane Dillon

Quashiba, a peasant girl, is about to be made queen because the king believes that she can spin and weave golden things. A tiny creature comes to save her under the condition that she has three chances to guess his name right. (West Indian)

via Goodreads; images via The Art of Leo and Diane Dillon

Reblogged from thethreehares
3
Jul
laclefdescoeurs:

La Donna, Philip Leslie Hale

laclefdescoeurs:

La Donna, Philip Leslie Hale

Reblogged from thethreehares
3
Jul
monetizeyourcat:

centuriespast:

Woven Textile
Fragment with reclining putto design.
Artist/maker unknown, Egyptian
Geography:
Made in Egypt, Africa
Date:
5th century
Medium:
Tan, blue, and red wool and linen tapestry weave
Philadelphia Museum of Art

monetizeyourcat:

centuriespast:

Woven Textile

Fragment with reclining putto design.

Artist/maker unknown, Egyptian

Geography:

Made in Egypt, Africa

Date:

5th century

Medium:

Tan, blue, and red wool and linen tapestry weave

Philadelphia Museum of Art

Reblogged from valvala
2
Jul

zooophagous:

geritsel:

Fritz Koch Gotha dog illustrations - just love ‘m

If you need me I’ll be convulsing on the floor from a cute overdose

Reblogged from valvala
30
Jun
madddscience:

Elementary Geography, 1856

madddscience:

Elementary Geography, 1856

Reblogged from madddscience
29
Jun

archiemcphee:

For a non-profit project called the Wall Art Festival, Japanese artist Yusuke Asai decorated a classroom of the Niranjana School in Sujata Village, which is located in the impoverished Bihar state of northeastern India. Asai used seven different types of local mud, cow dung, dirt, dust, ash and straw to create an intricate and immersive mural that completely covered the walls and ceiling of the classroom.

The Niranjana School was founded using donations from Japanese students and continues to maintain a connection with Japan. The Wall Art Festival strives to bring both local and Japanese artists into the school who use the school itself as a canvas and interact with the students. It also seeks to raise awareness about and help resolve numerous poverty, education and employment issues faced by small, isolated villages such as Sujata.

[via My Modern Metropolis and Spoon & Tamago]

Reblogged from archiemcphee
27
Jun

dynamicafrica:

Portraits of Moroccans/North Africans by Spanish artist José Tapiro y Baro (1830-1913) 

Reblogged from thethreehares
7
Jun
Reblogged from theartofanimation
4
Jun

sophiafosterdimino:

Ĵ⌓Ĵ ≺ ʜᎬ𝙻ᑭ Ϲ◦ϻ𐌓⨆ᵀЄᖇ 〉

Reblogged from roboticdreams
24
May
totalefinsternis:

missingscore:

athena-the-elusive:

“The Archer of the Rose” by Donato Giancola. Very heroic piece, on an epic scale. Illustrators have tended to get a bad  reputation as not being “true artists” as the subject of their work is “confined” by their text. I disagree. I have never read the series for which this artwork was commissioned, but it speaks to me as surely as if I knew that indomitable woman with the bow. The picture exists in itself. That’s true art.

This is so beautiful.

Ah this guy is incredible. He always goes to Dragon*Con and for the past 2 years I’ve been meaning to make it to his panel, but I never get the chance :(

totalefinsternis:

missingscore:

athena-the-elusive:

“The Archer of the Rose” by Donato Giancola. Very heroic piece, on an epic scale. Illustrators have tended to get a bad  reputation as not being “true artists” as the subject of their work is “confined” by their text. I disagree. I have never read the series for which this artwork was commissioned, but it speaks to me as surely as if I knew that indomitable woman with the bow. The picture exists in itself. That’s true art.

This is so beautiful.

Ah this guy is incredible. He always goes to Dragon*Con and for the past 2 years I’ve been meaning to make it to his panel, but I never get the chance :(

Reblogged from valvala
23
May
medievalpoc:

aseantoo submitted to medievalpoc:
Sir Joshua ReynoldsPortrait of Huang Ya DongUK (1776) Knole. 
The blog Treasure Hunt (representing the National Trust Collections of the UK) says of the subject:

The Knole guidebook mentions that he worked as a page in the household of John Frederick Sackville, 3rd Duke of Dorset (1745-1799) and that he attended Sevenoaks School.The boy had been brought to England from Guangzhou (Canton) by the Duke’s old schoolfriend John Bradby Blake (1745-1773), who worked for the East India Company.
However, when I did an online search for Blake I found out that he was a keen naturalist and that he had brought the boy, called Huang Ya Dong, to England because of his knowledge of the propagation and use of Chinese plants. 
Huang became a minor celebrity, advising Mrs Delaney and the Duchess of Portland on Chinese plants, Josiah Wedgewood on porcelain manufacture and the physician Andrew Duncan on acupuncture…
It is not known what happened to Huang subsequently – he may simply have lived out his days as a servant at Knole (where he was known by the other servants as Warnoton). Perhaps he followed the 3rd Duke to Paris when he was appointed ambassador to the court of Louis XVI. 

medievalpoc:

aseantoo submitted to medievalpoc:

Sir Joshua Reynolds
Portrait of Huang Ya Dong
UK (1776) 
Knole. 

The blog Treasure Hunt (representing the National Trust Collections of the UK) says of the subject:

The Knole guidebook mentions that he worked as a page in the household of John Frederick Sackville, 3rd Duke of Dorset (1745-1799) and that he attended Sevenoaks School.The boy had been brought to England from Guangzhou (Canton) by the Duke’s old schoolfriend John Bradby Blake (1745-1773), who worked for the East India Company.

However, when I did an online search for Blake I found out that he was a keen naturalist and that he had brought the boy, called Huang Ya Dong, to England because of his knowledge of the propagation and use of Chinese plants. 

Huang became a minor celebrity, advising Mrs Delaney and the Duchess of Portland on Chinese plants, Josiah Wedgewood on porcelain manufacture and the physician Andrew Duncan on acupuncture…

It is not known what happened to Huang subsequently – he may simply have lived out his days as a servant at Knole (where he was known by the other servants as Warnoton). Perhaps he followed the 3rd Duke to Paris when he was appointed ambassador to the court of Louis XVI. 

Reblogged from medievalpoc
23
May