archiemcphee:

Seattle-based artist Carol Milne knits with glass, or rather, she creates wonderful glass sculptures that make it seem as though she’s either a superhuman glass knitter or in possession of enchanted knitting needles and very specialized gloves. The reality is actually much more complicated, but no less awesome. Milne invented her glass knitting technique back in 2006. It’s a process that involves knitting with wax instead of glass, followed by lost-wax casting, mold-making and kiln-casting.

First, a model of the sculpture is made from wax which is then encased by a refractory mold material that can withstand extremely high temperatures. Next, hot steam is used to melt the wax, leaving behind an empty cavity in the shape of the artwork. Pieces of room temperature glass are then placed inside the mold which is then heated to 1,400-1,600 degrees Fahrenheit depending on the type of glass. Afterward, the piece is slowly cooled over a period of several weeks, followed by a careful excavation process, where Milne delicately chips away like an archaeologist to reveal the final piece.

To check out more of Carol Milne’s extraordinary artwork visit the Glass Art SocietyMilne’s Facebook page or her online gallery.

[via Colossal]

Reblogged from archiemcphee
15
Oct
Reblogged from theartofanimation
8
Oct

huffingtonpost:

This Man With Severe Cerebral Palsy Created Mind-Blowing Art Using Just A Typewriter

Last year, 22-time Emmy award-winning reporter John Stofflet posted this news video he created for KING-TV in 2004, featuring Paul Smith and his artistic talents.

See the full video to see more of Smith’s artworks and to learn more about his inspiring story go here. 

Reblogged from cyclopette
30
Sep
Reblogged from theartofanimation
19
Sep
Reblogged from theartofanimation
18
Sep
Reblogged from theartofanimation
16
Sep

thesnicketfile:

"I finally understood that great works don’t begin as great works. They begin as rough ideas. I realized that creation is a process. I thought if I can understand the first step I can learn the next step. I was fully aware that I had much to learn, but I was confident that I could learn it.

Here’s a rough sketch of my own. This is the sketch that later became the cover for The Bad Beginning

Brett Helquist

Reblogged from thesnicketfile
8
Sep
Reblogged from theartofanimation
15
Aug
shellbow:

contemporaryelfinchild:

nowisthewinter:

peternyc:

Photo of a fight in the Ukranian Parliament or Renaissance painting? 

Slap them all in togas instead of suits and it would perfect

It also follows a pyramidal composition!

However, I would argue that this picture is more Baroque than Renaissance. Notable features of Baroque art are:
Images are direct, obvious, and dramatic.
Tries to draw the viewer in to participate in the scene.
Depictions feel physically and psychologically real. Emotionally intense.
Extravagant settings and ornamentation.
Dramatic use of color.
Dramatic contrasts between light and dark, light and shadow.
As opposed to Renaissance art with its clearly defined planes, with each figure placed in isolation from each other, Baroque art has continuous overlapping of figures and elements.
Common themes: grandiose visions, ecstasies and conversions, martyrdom and death, intense light, intense psychological moments.
In the baroque, artists strove to evoke aesthetic responses. Now I’m not talking about aesthetic as in “oh thats pretty” I’m talking about aesthetic like that punch in the gut reaction you get to something.
One of the ways this was done was through the depiction of intense emotion which we see in this photograph. compare to Bernini

The picture also displays a wonderful use of chiaroscuro (an effect of contrasted light and shadow created by light falling unevenly or from a particular direction on something) a style used extensively by Caravaggio and other Baroque artists.

 

shellbow:

contemporaryelfinchild:

nowisthewinter:

peternyc:

Photo of a fight in the Ukranian Parliament or Renaissance painting? 

Slap them all in togas instead of suits and it would perfect

It also follows a pyramidal composition!

However, I would argue that this picture is more Baroque than Renaissance. Notable features of Baroque art are:

  • Images are direct, obvious, and dramatic.
  • Tries to draw the viewer in to participate in the scene.
  • Depictions feel physically and psychologically real. Emotionally intense.
  • Extravagant settings and ornamentation.
  • Dramatic use of color.
  • Dramatic contrasts between light and dark, light and shadow.
  • As opposed to Renaissance art with its clearly defined planes, with each figure placed in isolation from each other, Baroque art has continuous overlapping of figures and elements.
  • Common themes: grandiose visions, ecstasies and conversions, martyrdom and death, intense light, intense psychological moments.

In the baroque, artists strove to evoke aesthetic responses. Now I’m not talking about aesthetic as in “oh thats pretty” I’m talking about aesthetic like that punch in the gut reaction you get to something.

One of the ways this was done was through the depiction of intense emotion which we see in this photograph. compare to Bernini

The picture also displays a wonderful use of chiaroscuro (an effect of contrasted light and shadow created by light falling unevenly or from a particular direction on something) a style used extensively by Caravaggio and other Baroque artists.

 

Reblogged from cyclopette
7
Aug

archiemcphee:

The work of Paris-based artist and E.N.S.A.D. researcher Lia Giraud is further proof that Science + Art = Awesome. These green photos weren’t taken, they were grown. Giraud cultures microscopic algae to form living landscapes and portraits. They aren’t photographs, they’re ‘algaegraphs.’

"The technique is similar to photography, but the photosensitivity of silver grains [in film] is replaced by photosensitive organisms: microalgae," says Giraud, 29.

To create each “algaegraph”, Giraud immerses the algae in a Petri dish filled with a mix of chemical nutrients, and exposes them to an image. “The cells react to the light and form solids of different densities,” she explains.

The outline of the image forms in just a few minutes, but it can take up to four days to achieve the final result. Click here to learn more.

[via designboom and Wired]

Reblogged from archiemcphee
4
Aug

archiemcphee:

Born in Hong Kong and now based in Pittsburgh, PA, artist Bovey Lee painstakingly hand cuts astonishingly intricate designs and scenes on large sheets of thin Chinese rice paper. These mesmerizing works are as awesomely detailed as they are delicate. Look closely and you’ll discover cityscapes hidden among leaves and grass or cars driving along what you first took to be blades of grass. Practically weightless all by them selves, Lee mounts her fragile cut paper pieces on silk before they’re hung on gallery walls.

Visit Bovey Lee’s cut paper gallery to check out more of her amazing cut paper creations.

[via Colossal]

Reblogged from archiemcphee
26
Jul

medievalpoc:

Fiction Week!

image

The Girl Who Spun Gold by Virginia Hamilton, Illustrated by Leo and Diane Dillon

Quashiba, a peasant girl, is about to be made queen because the king believes that she can spin and weave golden things. A tiny creature comes to save her under the condition that she has three chances to guess his name right. (West Indian)

via Goodreads; images via The Art of Leo and Diane Dillon

Reblogged from thethreehares
3
Jul
laclefdescoeurs:

La Donna, Philip Leslie Hale

laclefdescoeurs:

La Donna, Philip Leslie Hale

Reblogged from thethreehares
3
Jul
monetizeyourcat:

centuriespast:

Woven Textile
Fragment with reclining putto design.
Artist/maker unknown, Egyptian
Geography:
Made in Egypt, Africa
Date:
5th century
Medium:
Tan, blue, and red wool and linen tapestry weave
Philadelphia Museum of Art

monetizeyourcat:

centuriespast:

Woven Textile

Fragment with reclining putto design.

Artist/maker unknown, Egyptian

Geography:

Made in Egypt, Africa

Date:

5th century

Medium:

Tan, blue, and red wool and linen tapestry weave

Philadelphia Museum of Art

Reblogged from valvala
2
Jul

zooophagous:

geritsel:

Fritz Koch Gotha dog illustrations - just love ‘m

If you need me I’ll be convulsing on the floor from a cute overdose

Reblogged from valvala
30
Jun