themrcreepypasta:

#litterbot

(Source: kim-azninvasion)

Reblogged from roboticdreams
21
Jul

gameraboy:

Marvel Comics is making Thor a woman.  From Time Magazine:

TIME: How do you think this will impact fans who have been with the male version of Thor for such a long time?

Jason Aaron, writer of the Thor series: If you’re a long-time Thor fan you know there’s kind of a tradition from time to time of somebody else picking up that hammer. Beta Ray Bill was a horse-faced alien guy who picked up the hammer. At one point Thor was a frog. So I think if we can accept Thor as a frog and a horse-faced alien, we should be able to accept a woman being able to pick up that hammer and wield it for a while, which surprisingly we’ve never really seen before.

Time: Marvel Comics Writers Explain Why They’re Making Thor a Woman

Reblogged from cyclopette
17
Jul

panaran:

It’s hot

Reblogged from panaran
13
Jul
kevinwada:

Storm
HeroesCon 2014 sketch
Basically had the go ahead to do whatever I wanted with her so I played with my redesign a bit.  

kevinwada:

Storm

HeroesCon 2014 sketch

Basically had the go ahead to do whatever I wanted with her so I played with my redesign a bit.  

Reblogged from kevinwada
3
Jul
steinerfrommars:

koalaparties:

A new comic by Emily! Click through to read. :)

Perfection…

steinerfrommars:

koalaparties:

A new comic by Emily! Click through to read. :)

Perfection…

Reblogged from oxboxer
20
Jun
comicsalliance:

ASK CHRIS SPECIAL EDITION: THE BEST OF ‘ASK CHRIS’
This week marks the 200th installment of ComicsAlliance’s weekly Ask Chris column, in which senior writer Chris Sims tackles reader questions that send him delving into comics history, the metaphors at the heart of his favorite characters that have developed over decades and, every now and then, straight up fan-fiction.
To mark the occasion, we’ve gone back through the archives (and taken a quick poll of readers) to sort out the absolute best of the past 200 columns, covering topics like the secular humanism at the heart of Scooby-Doo, the complicated chronology of Super Mario Bros., the 75-year competition between Marvel and DC, and more. And Batman. So, so much Batman.
Some of the items discussed:
Why Doesn’t Batman Kill?
Batgirl Walks Again
Scooby-Doo And Secular Humanism
Why Spider-Man Is The Best Character Ever
Bob Kane Is Just The Worst
Building a Better Superhero Costume
READ MORE

comicsalliance:

ASK CHRIS SPECIAL EDITION: THE BEST OF ‘ASK CHRIS’

This week marks the 200th installment of ComicsAlliance’s weekly Ask Chris column, in which senior writer Chris Sims tackles reader questions that send him delving into comics history, the metaphors at the heart of his favorite characters that have developed over decades and, every now and then, straight up fan-fiction.

To mark the occasion, we’ve gone back through the archives (and taken a quick poll of readers) to sort out the absolute best of the past 200 columns, covering topics like the secular humanism at the heart of Scooby-Doo, the complicated chronology of Super Mario Bros., the 75-year competition between Marvel and DC, and more. And Batman. So, so much Batman.

Some of the items discussed:

  • Why Doesn’t Batman Kill?
  • Batgirl Walks Again
  • Scooby-Doo And Secular Humanism
  • Why Spider-Man Is The Best Character Ever
  • Bob Kane Is Just The Worst
  • Building a Better Superhero Costume

READ MORE

Reblogged from comicsalliance
19
Jun

coelasquid:

jim-moroniarty:

tastefullyoffensive:

After 19 years, Bill Watterson, the reclusive creator of Calvin and Hobbes returns to cartooning as a secret guest artist in Stephan Pastis’ Pearls Before Swine (read the whole story on Stephan’s blog).

Bill Watterson is fascinating.

This is delightful.

Reblogged from coelasquid
7
Jun

Waaaaay back when we got a newspaper I loved Pearls Before Swine and back before I got into webcomics I would read newspaper comics online because my first foray into comics was via newspaper comics– specifically the collections of Calvin and Hobbes, Peanuts, The Far Side, and Bloom County we had, as well as others from the library like Foxtrot, Mutts,and maybe Non Sequitur? Did that have collections or did I just read that obsessively I can’t remember now for a while I followed it because its Sunday strip had a huge narrative arc and I collected it all digitally at one point, shit, do I still have that?

I’m getting off track.

At any rate I wish I had been keeping up with Pearls Before Swine as well as I had been when I was middle school or even early high school because it’s still funny and holy shit apparently this happened and it’s glorious and you have to read about it or at least see the three strips that BIll Watterson drew they are wonderful

7
Jun
Reblogged from superhappy
24
May

snakewife:

gailsimone:

dbvictoria:

Gail Simone is on a tear on twitter this morning.

I said some stuff.

You said some great stuff. Wow.

Reblogged from snakewife
23
May
Wonder Woman is Worthy.

anawfullybigaventura:

blue-author:

mangacide:

image

Fun Fact: In the Marvel vs DC crossover it was established that Wonder Woman is in fact Worthy of wielding the hammer of Thor.

And then she put it down, because she thought it would be unworthy of her to take advantage of its power.

Wonder Woman’s standards are higher than Mjolnir’s.

IF THE HAMMER THINKS SHES WORTHY WHY DONT THE MARKETING EXECS

Reblogged from cyclopette
20
May

why-i-love-comics:

Colleen Coover and the wonderful women of Marvel

from Girl Comics #1-3

written and drawn by Colleen Coover

Reblogged from valvala
18
May

jojoseames:

An excellent article neatly summarizing things that everyone who makes (or likes) comics should know. Know your history, babes. Know why we are the way we are.

(Source: postcardsfromspace)

Reblogged from jojoseames
14
May

annavonsyfert:

drama and snake-friendship.

I was gonna make like a 2 page comic just for fun and then it ended up with 6 pages, woops

Reblogged from cyclopette
13
May

americachavez:

William H. Foster III, comic book historian, on representation in comic books. From PBS’s Superheroes: A Never-Ending Battle.

Because a post crossed my dash recently asking why we need to push for more representation in comic books and media in general. 50 years later, this man still tears up because in one panel, Peter Parker spoke to an unnamed black kid. That’s why we need representation.

Reblogged from seananmcguire
12
May