karleighthompson:

My moss scape I made in Ireland 

Reblogged from luongomaplebacon
21
Feb
geogallery:

Jeremejevite
Jeremejevite was discovered in 1883 at Mt Soktuj, Eastern Siberia, Russia. Only a few isolated crystals up to 5 cm in length have been reported from the type locality. The crystals resembled a yellowish beryl in appearance.  For more than 100 years, this mineral was one of the rarest of all known minerals.

geogallery:

Jeremejevite

Jeremejevite was discovered in 1883 at Mt Soktuj, Eastern Siberia, Russia. Only a few isolated crystals up to 5 cm in length have been reported from the type locality. The crystals resembled a yellowish beryl in appearance.  For more than 100 years, this mineral was one of the rarest of all known minerals.

Reblogged from geogallery
18
Dec

smurfberries:

Jill Bliss on Instagram (~_~)

(Source: jillbliss.com)

Reblogged from luongomaplebacon
7
Nov

seafarers:

Moorland Copse by Duncan George

Reblogged from luongomaplebacon
18
Oct
findwanderlust:

Watamu Beach | Kenya

findwanderlust:

Watamu Beach | Kenya

(Source: Flickr / rowanpalmer)

Reblogged from theafricatheynevershowyou
29
Aug

archiemcphee:

From the Department of Awesome Natural Wonders comes this impressive geological formation - an enormous rock perfectly balanced atop a smooth mound. Located deep inside the forests of Finland, the balancing rock is called Kummakivi:

“There is still no scientific explanation for how the rock, whose given name translates as ‘strange rock’ in Finnish, has wound up in such a perplexing position.”

However it happened, it’s a pretty awesome sight. But we don’t recommend standing under it for too long.

[via My Modern Metropolis]

Reblogged from archiemcphee
2
Jan

burgerthief:

So: Little known fact.

Clouds like this actually scare me a bit. The shadowing just emphasizes how Incredibly Huge they are, and that freaks me out some.

Really? I love clouds like this, I just want to be completely enveloped by them. I love when I fly through them on planes, it’s like a surreal, watery wonderland, floating in the sky. It’s wonderful.

(Source: lifesanillusion-madman)

Reblogged from burgerthief
13
Dec
sciencenote:


The head of a flower is made up of small seeds which are produced at the center, and then migrate towards the outside to fill eventually all the space (as for the sunflower but on a much smaller level). Each new seed appears at a certain angle in relation to the preceeding one. For example, if the angle is 90 degrees, that is 1/4 of a turn.
…This angle has to be chosen very precisely: variations of 1/10 of a degree destroy completely the optimization. When the angle is exactly the golden mean, and only this one, two families of spirals (one in each direction) are then visible: their numbers correspond to the numerator and denominator of 2 consecutive numbers in the Fibonacci sequence, which is proved to converge toward the Golden Mean value of 1.6180339… (in the picture we have 21/34, the 7th and 8th terms of the Fibonacci sequence).
The Fibonacci sequence is named after Leonardo of Pisa, who was known as Fibonacci. Fibonacci’s 1202 book Liber Abaci introduced the sequence to Western European mathematics, although the sequence had been described earlier in Indian mathematics. (By modern convention, the sequence begins either with F0 = 0 or with F1 = 1. The Liber Abaci began the sequence with F1 = 1, without an initial 0.)

sciencenote:

The head of a flower is made up of small seeds which are produced at the center, and then migrate towards the outside to fill eventually all the space (as for the sunflower but on a much smaller level). Each new seed appears at a certain angle in relation to the preceeding one. For example, if the angle is 90 degrees, that is 1/4 of a turn.

This angle has to be chosen very precisely: variations of 1/10 of a degree destroy completely the optimization. When the angle is exactly the golden mean, and only this one, two families of spirals (one in each direction) are then visible: their numbers correspond to the numerator and denominator of 2 consecutive numbers in the Fibonacci sequence, which is proved to converge toward the Golden Mean value of 1.6180339… (in the picture we have 21/34, the 7th and 8th terms of the Fibonacci sequence).
The Fibonacci sequence is named after Leonardo of Pisa, who was known as Fibonacci. Fibonacci’s 1202 book Liber Abaci introduced the sequence to Western European mathematics, although the sequence had been described earlier in Indian mathematics. (By modern convention, the sequence begins either with F0 = 0 or with F1 = 1. The Liber Abaci began the sequence with F1 = 1, without an initial 0.)
Reblogged from sciencenote
12
Dec
archiemcphee:

Oh hai! French macro photographer Fabien Bravin captured this awesome image of a teeny-tiny praying mantis larva peering over the top of an American poppy flower. The photo was published by National Geographic.
[via Le Journal De La Photographie]

archiemcphee:

Oh hai! French macro photographer Fabien Bravin captured this awesome image of a teeny-tiny praying mantis larva peering over the top of an American poppy flower. The photo was published by National Geographic.

[via Le Journal De La Photographie]

Reblogged from archiemcphee
25
Nov
northedelweiss:

Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland
Reblogged from northedelweiss
25
Sep

earthandscience:

Nestled under a South American palm leaf you might just be lucky enough to find this rare white bat, the Northern Ghost Bat (Diclidurus albus), or Jumby Bat as it is otherwise known. 

I say you might find one alone under a palm leaf because although these bats would prefer to nest in large colonies, it’s very difficult to find the required cave space or rock crevices in their habitat to do so.  Therefore, they only roost in small groups at best.

Images: SergeiKoultchitskii

Reblogged from earthandscience
1
Jul
Today: Fossilized Squid Ink!

dailysciencething:

Check out this fossilized-ink-sac. Researchers confirmed that the pigment in it is chemically similar to the sort used by modern squids, chock full of eumelanin. The head researcher said:

The ‘aha moment’ for me was when we looked at the techniques for chemical bonding and we couldn’t find anything that distinguished the pigment in the fossil from the pigment in a modern-day cuttlefish, which suggests the pigment hasn’t changed in 160 million years. When I think about other evolutionary transitions that just amazes me.

AWESOME

Reblogged from dailysciencething
22
May
kqedscience:

Picture of the Day: Star Trails From the International Space Station
“Astronaut Don Pettit created this image of star trails as seen from the International Space Station approximately 240 miles above Earth. He explains, “My star trail images are made by taking a time exposure of about 10 to 15 minutes. However, with modern digital cameras, 30 seconds is about the longest exposure possible, due to electronic detector noise effectively snowing out the image. To achieve the longer exposures I do what many amateur astronomers do. I take multiple 30-second exposures, then ‘stack’ them using imaging software, thus producing the longer exposure.” The above picture combines 18 such exposures.”

kqedscience:

Picture of the Day: Star Trails From the International Space Station

Astronaut Don Pettit created this image of star trails as seen from the International Space Station approximately 240 miles above Earth. He explains, “My star trail images are made by taking a time exposure of about 10 to 15 minutes. However, with modern digital cameras, 30 seconds is about the longest exposure possible, due to electronic detector noise effectively snowing out the image. To achieve the longer exposures I do what many amateur astronomers do. I take multiple 30-second exposures, then ‘stack’ them using imaging software, thus producing the longer exposure.” The above picture combines 18 such exposures.”

Reblogged from kqedscience
17
May

smithsonianmag:

Nature’s Best Photography

Part adventurer, part artist, and part engineer, nature photographers travel the globe to document the beauty and mystery of its farthest reaches. The images they bring home help to broaden our awareness and appreciation of the natural world.

Ed note: The Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History has more photos and information on the exhibit.

Reblogged from smithsonianmag
11
May