My lawyer gives the same speech to everyone who wants to do business with me now. ‘Nicki is not one of those artists who allow her representatives to make decisions for her.’ I’m on conference calls all day with lawyers, accountants, and executives—people of power—and they treat me with respect. Because I command respect. I’m not cocky, but I deserve to know what’s going on. It’s my brand and my life. That’s my advice to women in general: Even if you’re doing a nine-to-five job, treat yourself like a boss. Not arrogant, but be sure of what you want—and don’t allow people to run anything for you without your knowledge. You want everyone to know, Okay, I can’t play games with her. I have to do right by this woman. That’s what it’s all about.

Nicki Minaj, Elle, April 2013

Adding partial source(via andyhutchins)

(Source: hrafnagaldr)

Reblogged from aquaticarbiter
1
Oct
If a girl is lucky enough to receive any sex education, she will be taught the biological basics. She’ll learn that men have penises and testicles and produce sperm and women have vaginas and uterii and produce ova. She’ll learn that when a man and a woman have sex, the man inserts his penis into the woman’s vagina until he ejaculates. She’ll learn that the semen in the ejaculate will render her vulnerable to pregnancy so she will have to protect herself by using a hormonal or a barrier contraceptive. Hormonal contraception is preferable because barrier methods such as condoms, while safer for women, apparently reduce sensation for men which is obviously a no-no. It’s much better that a woman take a pill every day for her entire reproductive lifespan, or get a painful injection every 12 weeks, or have a copper rod inserted into her uterus, or a silicone rod implanted into her arm. She probably won’t learn that 3 out of 4 women never orgasm from vaginal intercourse. She almost definitely won’t learn how women do achieve orgasm. She’ll learn her place as a receptacle.
Reblogged from thethreehares
30
Sep
Harry then did something that was both very brave and very stupid.
Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone (page 176) or as I like to call it: A summary of all seven Harry Potter books summed up in one sentence.  (via scribbledwriting)
Reblogged from cyclopette
27
Sep
When men imagine a female uprising, they imagine a world in which women rule men as men have ruled women.

Sally Kempton

It’s been apparent to me for a while that most men can’t really imagine “equality.”  All they can imagine is having the existing power structure inverted.

I cannot decide whether this shows how unimaginative they are, or shows how aware they must be of what they do in order to so deeply fear having it turned on them. (via lepetitmortpourmoi)

"Most men can’t really imagine “equality.”  All they can imagine is having the existing power structure inverted." (via misandry-mermaid)

(Source: yourenotsylviaplath)

Reblogged from bardolatress
27
Sep
I urge you to please notice when you are happy.
Kurt Vonnegut  (via myadventurousheart)

(Source: adelineania)

Reblogged from bardolatress
27
Sep
Girls are trained to say, ‘I wrote this, but it’s probably really stupid.’ Well, no, you wouldn’t write a novel if you thought it was really stupid. Men are much more comfortable going, ‘I wrote this book because I have a unique perspective that the world needs to hear.’ Girls are taught from the age of seven that if you get a compliment, you don’t go, ‘Thank you’, you go, ‘No, you’re insane.’

Lena Dunham (x)

Why I love her and why you should too.

(via taylorswift)

Haha I kinda like the next paragraph more,

Could she always take a compliment? “No, I had to learn to go, ‘Thank you.’ Because it’s much easier to go, ‘Thank you so much, I’m actually a huge piece of shit who has no worthy things to offer the world, so I appreciate that you said that.’ “

But that’s just me

(Source: mylittlebookofquotes)

Reblogged from seananmcguire
25
Sep
'You can talk all you want about other superhero movies, but it’s Batman and Superman, let’s just be honest,' Snyder said in an interview with USA Today in July. 'I don’t know how you get bigger than that.'
22
Sep

— Catherynne M. Valente, In the Night Garden

(Source: durendals)

Reblogged from rinburevolution
21
Sep
To fight monsters, we created monsters of our own.

Pacific Rim, 2013


One of the greatest things about this quote (and this movie) is that it had all the potential in the world to spread the dark and terrible (and often truthful) idea that in order to fight the darkness, one must absorb some of that darkness. It was very prominent in The Dark Knight trilogy, especially as articulated by Harvey Dent: “You die a hero, or you live long enough to see yourself become the villain.” 

Pacific Rim doesn’t do this. Mankind bands together for a true world war. There are already enough monsters coming for them; they do not need to become monstrous themselves. The monsters they create are not beasts but guards and armor to protect, not universally destroy. The jaegers rarely deliberately destroy massive structures (remember Gipsy Danger carefully stepping over a large walkway and nimbly navigating between buildings during the fight in Hong Kong). The pilots in the jaegers are very human and imperfect but are still heroes. They may have created monsters, but they did not become them.

Everyone and their mother has lauded this, but it bears repeating: in Pacific Rim, mankind’s power is not in its capacity for destruction or power or control or harnessing its deepest instincts but instead in its humanity—its ability to rebuild, to persevere, to empathize and to understand. 

(via mymarysunshine)

Reblogged from seananmcguire
21
Sep
I’m really tired of people using and misusing the terms “PC,” “PC police,” and “political correctness.” If you think that saying abusing your wife or child is bad is turning the NFL “PC” or telling an artist not to draw women with their ass in the air on a book you’re trying to sell to women is playing the “PC police” or that the world would be a better place if only whine whine we didn’t have to deal with so much “political correctness” in entertainment then you’re either a dinosaur or a bigot. The term political correctness is used by people who have primarily been considered “standard” (as in white, male, straight, etc etc) to complain that they have to consider the viewpoints of people who aren’t like them. I’m not saying you have to agree with inclusiveness if you really want to stamp your feet over people being equal to one another as human beings, but you don’t get to run the show anymore. You don’t get to refer to the words “transgender” and “cisgender” as being PC or to women asking not to be shown as objects as PC or to people saying that Redskins is a racist team name as PC. These things are all matters of treating people who aren’t straight white dudes like they are just as important as those straight white dudes. It’s not “politically correct.” It’s just correct. Using a term like “PC” just puts a spotlight on you as an intolerant crybaby.
Your voice has been the only voice that matters for so long that it’s frustrating to hear that it’s not the only one that matters anymore, I know. Learn to be a human who has to listen to others.
Reblogged from obscuruslupa
19
Sep
When people say ‘This is my baby,’ they don’t always mean a baby. Sometimes they mean a dog.
A Somali student, on what has surprised her most about the United States (via 391705)

(Source: africandogontheprairie)

Reblogged from cyclopette
16
Sep
Everyone thinks of [fairy tales] in terms of poisoned apples and glass coffins, and forgets that they represent girls who walked into dark forests and remade them into their own reflections.
Reblogged from seananmcguire
16
Sep

"It’s a really rich period in history, where this giant opposition we had going for 10 years with the Nazis is gone, and we’re not completely positive what the rules are anymore," Markus said. "Who gets the scientists? Who gets the secrets? It’s all on the table. Everyone developed these skills in World War II. People became spies, people became murderers. And suddenly the war was over, and they came back, and it’s like, ‘Wow, I know how to do some shit. Now, what do I do with this?’ It’s nice to play with that assortment of characters. An office, basically full of people who just came back from the war. There’s no telling what any of them experienced last year."

"We have a tendency to think of history as this fixed thing," McFeely added. “‘Oh, that’s right. Good guys won, 1945. Then it was the ’50s.’ It’s just not the case. Everything was up for grabs for quite a while, and murky. We didn’t know we really won."

Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely on Agent Carter [x] (via omnicat)
Reblogged from asofterbucky
16
Sep
Reblogged from lackofa
15
Sep
I would much rather be the ‘obnoxious feminist girl’ than be complicit in my own dehumanization.
Kathleen Hanna (via camewiththeframe)
Reblogged from seananmcguire
14
Sep