I asked myself what style we women could have adopted that would have been unmarked, like the men’s. The answer was none. There is no unmarked woman.

There is no woman’s hair style that can be called standard, that says nothing about her. The range of women’s hair styles is staggering, but a woman whose hair has no particular style is perceived as not caring about how she looks, which can disqualify her for many positions, and will subtly diminish her as a person in the eyes of some.

Women must choose between attractive shoes and comfortable shoes. When our group made an unexpected trek, the woman who wore flat, laced shoes arrived first. Last to arrive was the woman in spike heels, shoes in hand and a handful of men around her.

If a woman’s clothing is tight or revealing (in other words, sexy), it sends a message — an intended one of wanting to be attractive, but also a possibly unintended one of availability. If her clothes are not sexy, that too sends a message, lent meaning by the knowledge that they could have been. There are thousands of cosmetic products from which women can choose and myriad ways of applying them. Yet no makeup at all is anything but unmarked. Some men see it as a hostile refusal to please them.

Women can’t even fill out a form without telling stories about themselves. Most forms give four titles to choose from. “Mr.” carries no meaning other than that the respondent is male. But a woman who checks “Mrs.” or “Miss” communicates not only whether she has been married but also whether she has conservative tastes in forms of address — and probably other conservative values as well. Checking “Ms.” declines to let on about marriage (checking “Mr.” declines nothing since nothing was asked), but it also marks her as either liberated or rebellious, depending on the observer’s attitudes and assumptions.

I sometimes try to duck these variously marked choices by giving my title as “Dr.” — and in so doing risk marking myself as either uppity (hence sarcastic responses like “Excuse me!”) or an overachiever (hence reactions of congratulatory surprise like “Good for you!”).

All married women’s surnames are marked. If a woman takes her husband’s name, she announces to the world that she is married and has traditional values. To some it will indicate that she is less herself, more identified by her husband’s identity. If she does not take her husband’s name, this too is marked, seen as worthy of comment: she has done something; she has “kept her own name.” A man is never said to have “kept his own name” because it never occurs to anyone that he might have given it up. For him using his own name is unmarked.

A married woman who wants to have her cake and eat it too may use her surname plus his, with or without a hyphen. But this too announces her marital status and often results in a tongue-tying string. In a list (Harvey O’Donovan, Jonathan Feldman, Stephanie Woodbury McGillicutty), the woman’s multiple name stands out. It is marked.

Reblogged from seananmcguire
21
Oct
The best comedy punches upwards towards the established structure of power, not downwards at oppressed classes
Reblogged from rosalarian
19
Oct
76% of negative feedback given to women included personality criticism. For men, 2%. The study speaks to the impossible tightrope women must walk to do their jobs competently and to make tough decisions while simultaneously coming across as nice to everyone, all the time.
Reblogged from stfu-moffat
19
Oct
Myers, in other words, may not be the model victim in the ongoing story of police brutality and white violence against young black men. But his death nonetheless has sparked an important wave in the burgeoning movement built around the notion that black lives matter. All black lives – not just those that draw the most public sympathy.
Reblogged from justice4mikebrown
18
Oct

Diversity always wins. Diversity isn’t going to leave music, or TV, or film no matter how many backlashes and reversals there are.

The “fake geek girls” aren’t going to leave your subculture; the “PC police” aren’t going to stop criticizing it. “Angry black women” aren’t getting off your TV and neither are angry Asian men. The “PC diversity brigade” of science-fiction writers is going to keep winning Hugo and Nebula awards, and someday my wife’s going to be one of them.

Critics like Anita Sarkeesian will keep on pointing out what’s bad in games so we can start looking for ways to make games better. Indie designers like Zoe Quinn and Kellee Santiago will keep pushing the boundaries of gaming at the fringes so that people like Manveer Heir and Rhianna Pratchett have breathing room to explore what mainstream “AAA” games can be.

Reactionaries know they can’t win. Their anger stems from their desperation. Read the #GamerGate tag for a while and realize the obsessive fixation on the “corrupt agenda in the gaming press” is, underneath the anger, fear. For all the damage they do, for all the people they hurt, they’re going to lose. Indeed, to react as they have is to prove that they’ve already lost.

After all, #GamerGate, did you think we’d crumble? Did you think we’d lay down and die?

No, not us. We will survive.

Arthur Chu, Of Gamers, Gates, and Disco Demolition: The Roots of Reactionary Rage (for the Daily beast)

A damn good article about how the very real violence resulting from what we call “culture wars” is yet another case of history repeating itself. Hopefully the determination of those willing to analyze, question, and hold media accountable for the narratives it tells us will ensure that this backlash will once again be the harbinger of social change.

(via medievalpoc)

Reblogged from medievalpoc
18
Oct

Ernest Hemingway would have died rather than have syntax. Or semicolons. I use a whole lot of half-assed semicolons; there was one of them just now; that was a semicolon after “semicolons,” and another one after “now.”

And another thing. Ernest Hemingway would have died rather than get old. And he did. He shot himself. A short sentence. Anything rather than a long sentence, a life sentence. Death sentences are short and very, very manly. Life sentences aren’t. They go on and on, all full of syntax and qualifying clauses and confusing references and getting old. And that brings up the real proof of what a mess I have made of being a man.

Ursula K. Le Guin on being a man – the finest, sharpest thing I’ve read in ages 

(via ananthymous)

DID YOU NOTICE THAT WHEN SHE WROTE ABOUT ERNEST HEMINGWAY KILLING HIMSELF SHE USED SHORT CHOPPY SENTENCES??? SHE’S SO FUCKING SMART

I like Hemingway AND Le Guin (although Le Guin is my favorite) and I love the way Le Guin writes about other writers. 

Also, this quote is slightly incorrect! It should end this way:

"And that brings up the real proof of what a mess I have made of being a man: I am not even young. Just about the time they finally started inventing women, I started getting old. And I went right on doing it. Shamelessly. I have allowed myself to get old and haven’t done one single thing about it, with a gun or anything."

I think it’s important to include that part, because I like when Le Guin talks about ageism (for lack of a better term) and how people see getting old as something shameful and weak, when really its the most natural thing for everyone in the world to do.

(via magnoliapearl)

(Source: explore-blog)

Reblogged from valvala
18
Oct

DC Comics has gone from one female creator (at the start of the New 52 in 2011) to 11 at the close of 2014.

Marvel Comics has moved from zero female-led monthly titles to 10 by the end of this year.

Wonder Woman is headlining three monthly titles for the first time in her 75 year career.

Marvel is pushing forward ideas like a female Thor, an African-American Captain America, and, if rumors are true, even a female Wolverine — diversifying their A-list for the first time ever.

DC has re-envisioned its entire Bat-line in October to reflect the need for genre diversity and attract new readers, reinvigorating Batgirl, Batwoman, and Secret Six, and introducing such titles as Gotham Academy, Klarion, Arkham Manor, and Gotham by Midnight.

Dynamite Entertainment is expanding its commitment to female-led titles and preparing an all-woman team book written by Gail Simone for 2015.

Valiant Comics has released its first ever female-led title, The Death-Defying Doctor Mirage, to much acclaim.

Dark Horse Comics is broadening its creator-owned base in the wake of the loss of their Star Wars license, publishing more non-corporate-owned material than ever before.

Archie Comics is aggressively pursuing its mission to diversify the denizens of Riverdale, and add a broad collection of new genres to its publishing mix, including horror and super-hero titles.

And companies like Image Comics, BOOM! Studios, IDW Publishing, and Monkeybrain Comics continue to broaden the sheer amount of different types of material available today for adults and kids both.

Matt Santori-Griffith, “Crisis of Epic Proportion: Time of Change.” (via lyrafay)

All true stuff…and nice to see!

(via gailsimone)

That would be my Senior Editor, folks. Comicosity don’t work with no dummies. 

(via virginiagentlenerd)

Reblogged from asofterbucky
18
Oct

I’m not an actual “terrorist,” but years ago the the government convicted me of a property crime it deemed “terrorism,” and since then, life has been interesting.

Especially flying. Since 2009, I’ve been on the TSA’s “terrorist watch list.” Not quite the “no fly list”, but close.

This means that when I fly, the TSA goes crazy. At various times, I’ve been refused entry to planes, tailed through airports, and told my Starbucks coffee might be a bomb.

This is my journal of traveling in post-9-11 America as someone on the government’s “terrorist” list. And it’s a lot funnier than you’d think…

After 9-11, congress directed the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) to identify people “who may be a threat to civil aviation or national security.”Those on The List are not allowed to be told why they are on The List, and the requirements for being added to The List are not made public. As of 2009, it is believed there are 14,000 people on The List.

But only one writing about it.

The Jetsetting Terrorist

This is fascinating.

(h/t seanbonner)

(Source: laughterkey)

Reblogged from seananmcguire
17
Oct
1:all fungi are edible.
2: some fungi are only edible once
Terry Pratchett (via bableman)
Reblogged from valvala
16
Oct

huntingjaeger:

nudityandnerdery:

2percentmelk:

(Source: http://www.reddit.com/r/IAmA/comments/21xynj/this_is_daniel_handler_aka_lemony_snicket_trapped/)

That is fantastic life advice.

Lemony Snicket doesn’t give a damn fuck

(Source: twopercentmelk)

Reblogged from bardolatress
16
Oct
Few female characters get to be “the Chosen One” in science fiction and fantasy. Leia is as much the child of Darth Vader as Luke is, but only Luke gets to use the force, be recruited by his dad and ultimately save the day. We don’t get impossibly clever female sleuths or the sexy spies with the awesome gadgets. And on the rare occasions that we do get those characters, they’re denigrated as unrealistic Mary Sues.
Reblogged from skankplissken
16
Oct
A hundred years ago they used to put on a white sheet and use a bloodhound against Negroes. Today they have taken off the white sheet and put on police uniforms and traded in the bloodhounds for police dogs, and they’re still doing the same thing.
Reblogged from cetra777
15
Oct
RE: Don’t focus too much on the negative in someone else’s work. Don’t make it your CRUSADE. Spend that effort making your own work better. Make your work the COUNTERARGUMENT to the work you don’t like.
Ronald Wimberly (via leseanthomas)
Reblogged from cryptovolans
12
Oct
Please don’t expect me to always be good and kind and loving. There are times when I will be cold and thoughtless and hard to understand.
Sylvia Plath (via bookaddictiion)
Reblogged from seananmcguire
12
Oct

fhoantells:

"I just want Bruce Lee to hold me as long as he can."

I’m dying.

(imgur album)

Reblogged from cyclopette
12
Oct