zeether:

Some of you MSTies may have heard the game Escape Velocity has an easter egg that’s a reference to the forklift song…I found a plugin for it that enabled the weapon by default and decided to show it off (while promptly killing myself in the process). I ran this in Basilisk II, an excellent Mac emulator.

Oh dang the best part about this was way you enabled this easter egg (other than the weapon itself which was waaayyy too fantastic I loved it) was by like… holding down x then pressing the title I think? And then like a set of parody lyrics for the MST3k theme came up about the programmer staying up too late to work on the game and scrolled past, ending with Tom Servo going “He tried to kill me with a forklift!” and going back to the title screen, gosh what memories. Haha I love this game, I totally wish Escape Velocity Nova had this easter egg (or that i could get Escape Velocity original to work in Nova theoretically there’s a way I just… can’t quite get it to work though I should have all the required parts I am not good at computer)

The forklift took a little getting used to as a weapon, definitely better long-range haha. I am not good at games which is why I heavily relied on it and got used to using it a lot…

Reblogged from fuckyeahmst3k
23
Jul

videohall:

News Anchor in my area loses it over a Fat Cat that likes to swim.

(Source: wdbj7.com)

Reblogged from allmarios
22
Jul

hulieta:

NO!!!!!!!!

Reblogged from talking-fiction
22
Jul

dustyoldroses:

Did I say “tonight” yesterday? Clearly I meant at the ungodliest hour in the following morning… *lies down*

Thanks for 13000 subs, guys! kitsubasa was FemMedic and izzybutt was FemSniper! Lyrics by me, a parody of the theme from Steven Universe! Instrumentals lovingly provided by SillyMakesVids!

Reblogged from dustyoldroses
22
Jul

thecrabqueen:

crabs will stop at nothing

Reblogged from cyclopette
22
Jul

sailorfailures:

That reaction when well-meaning protagonists keep mistaking you for antagonist

Reblogged from sailorfailures
21
Jul

lil-mizz-jaye:

If there’s anything in this world that should never have been made

This isn’t one of them

Reblogged from cyclopette
20
Jul

caseylalonde:

itoldyouimbusy:

Bitch I’m on my swag

MORE OF THIS GUY

Reblogged from cyclopette
19
Jul

diananock:

whethervane:

friendlytroll:

anxietypizza:

Important

IM SO UPSET

[HORRIBLE INEXPLICABLE NOISES]

[CRYING]

The more I watch it, the funnier it gets.

Reblogged from diananock
19
Jul

yellowfur:

zaptagon:

deelekgolo:

image

image

yoUTre M y 2000THT fUCkinG FOLLWOEr

JESUS FDIHING CHRIST 

ohmygod

Reblogged from cyclopette
18
Jul

animenostalgia:

Viz Media’s official Sailor Moon Twitter just posted a new official Dub Clip from episode 1 of classic Sailor Moon! Check it out on Youtube.

Reblogged from sailorfailures
18
Jul

nekoama:

emmyc:

purplepeepbits:

New Mickey Short! "Goofy’s Grandma" is by far one my my favorite Mickey shorts. I did a lot of Mickeys in this one with his trademark Aaron Springer chubby cheeks.

holy crap this is my favorite one so far hahaha

This was a really fun one, you guys enjoy it!

Reblogged from cyclopette
18
Jul

oneweekoneband:

An SNL Digital Short, “The Shooting AKA Dear Sister”

To say, “It all began here” would be inaccurate. It actually began here, when Marissa Cooper shot Trey Atwood in order to save her boyfriend (Trey’s brother Ryan) from being killed in the second season finale of The O.C, the bullet triggering the “Whatcha say?” middle eight of “Hide and Seek.” And yet, the Saturday Night Live sketch is where it all began. “Hide and Seek”’s placement in that episode’s climax was no different than any other musical placement on the show. In fact, “Hide and Seek” had already appeared earlier in the same episode. Furthermore, the “The Shooting AKA Dear Sister” works even without the reference. The joke is simple – each gunshot starts the song and a melodramatic death sequence – and played up to absurdity. The sketch came at an interesting time; the Digital Shorts were still a novel feature to Saturday Night Live, an interesting way to break up the string of live sketches. Additionally, during 2007, the Digital Shorts team of Andy Sandberg, Akiva Schaffer and Jorma Taccone were focused more on basic, low-budget premises that were a far cry from later, large-scale productions of The Lonely Island such as “I’m On a Boat” or “I Just Had Sex.” Given this, it’s not surprising that “Dear Sister” worked so well for its time.

The joke soon became a meme, and participating was about as easy as making an image macro today: simply splice the portion of “Hide and Seek” onto a death scene, and you’re done. This was one of my first experiences with a viral sensation, and in the early days of YouTube, I felt like a kid in a candy store. I believe the Lion King version made me laugh the hardest. Though the meme is harder to track down today (many videos were probably removed, when YouTube was more stringent about copyright issues and the fair use doctrine was still a new concept), there are several iterations of the meme, all involving that small portion of “Hide and Seek” that would become recognizable enough to later be sampled.

***

Last year, Billboard and Nielsen caused controversy when they announced that YouTube streams would count toward Hot 100 rankings. On first blush, this made sense; the rise of Vevo and single releases via audio- or lyric-video meant that people were beginning to consume music differently. The controversy arose from the timing of the methodological shift, which coincided with the “Harlem Shake” virus. Thanks to the new rules, Bauuer’s woozy trap song spent five consecutive weeks atop the Hot 100, even though what was pushing it there were videos that only featured thirty seconds of the song. The brief flurry over “Harlem Shake”’s reign and the new rules broached important issues regarding how we see the Hot 100 and its implications, the tension between viewing No. 1 status as a mere statistic (“This is the most consumed song in the country this week”) or as a trophy (“This is the best song in the country this week”).

Though perhaps its exposure was on a smaller scale (given YouTube’s nascency at the time), I wonder how “Hide and Seek” would have benefited from the new system. Also, because (like the “Harlem Shake” videos), only a fraction of the song was used, I wonder whether its hypothetical success on the charts would have caused the same stir that “Harlem Shake” did. Most importantly, how would it have affected Imogen’s career? The “Dear Sister” meme, like most memes, had simultaneously positive and negative effects. The positive, obviously, was that a whole new audience was hearing “Hide and Seek” for the first time. The negative was that the “Whatcha say?” verse became a punchline, an overly self-serious moment that had little function other than the comedic effect of its discord with a clip of Mufasa being thrown off Pride Rock. The sobering reality of memes is that they don’t care either way what they do for songs like “Hide and Seek” – they’re only in it for the LOLs.

Luckily, there would be another way for Imogen to benefit from this sudden windfall.

***

In 2009, American artist Jason Derulo released his first single, a J.R. Rotem vehicle titled “Whatcha Say” that sampled the “Dear Sister”-famed portion of “Hide and Seek.” An inoffensive slice of Autotune-heavy R&B, the song finds Derulo pleading his ex to come back. Imogen does not play the role of that ex; she’s more like a Greek chorus, echoing Derulo’s aches: “What did she say?” It’s an appropriate use of the original, since both songs attack their subject in those lines, demanding an answer for a wrongdoing. “Whatcha Say” hit the top of the Hot 100 and was certified three times platinum in the US, Derulo’s most successful song until “Talk Dirty” began its radio takeover this year.

So what does Imogen have to say about all this? She approves! An unfortunately common reaction to a pop musician’s sampling of a more underground song is that the sampler has sullied or ruined or destroyed the song’s reputation. And while I don’t care for “Whatcha Say,” Imogen’s attitude toward her music – that once it’s out in the open, it’s free for anyone to use and interpret as they like – is refreshing, both from a business standpoint (I’m sure she doesn’t mind the royalties) and a creative standpoint. Another notable line from Imogen’s linked interview is that she finds the use of “Hide and Seek” in “Whatcha Say” much more creative than those “rubbish house remixes, like ‘untz, untz’ all the way through it.” My question is: what remix could she be referring to? My guess is Tiësto’s.

Reblogged from oneweekoneband
18
Jul

Too Darn Hot (Dance Sequence) – Kiss Me, Kate

14
Jul

moa810:

Happy birthday Okosan!

July 12th

Reblogged from moa810
12
Jul